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Jan Greenwood, author of Women at War, wants to revolutionize the value we women place on our own gender and the way we treat one another. Battle scars have a profound effect on our lives and create places of lack in our souls. When wounds remain unhealed, we experience a progression of pain that leaves us with an inability to receive and give love.

The Damaging Effects Women Encounter from a Progression of Pain

The Damaging Effects Women Encounter from a Progression of Pain


Many women have been deeply wounded by relationships with friends, sisters, or female coworkers that have turned competitive, slanderous, or even vengeful. From a young age, many girls experience the rejection, hurt, and mistrust that occurs when women war against one another.

Jan Greenwood, author of Women at War, wants to revolutionize the value we women place on our own gender and the way we treat one another. Battle scars have a profound effect on our lives and create places of lack in our souls. When wounds remain unhealed, we experience a progression of pain that leaves us with an inability to receive and give love.

1. We experience a form of emotional deadness (barrenness). 
We lose the ability to nurture others, sometimes even our own children, because we have not been nurtured ourselves. When we refuse to feel pain, we also lose the ability to feel joy.

2. Insecurity grows when our wounds remain unhealed. 
Lacking love, we become rude, fearful, and prone to slander. Since we don’t want to be rejected, we isolate ourselves from the perceived threat (other women).

3. When women think they can only depend on themselves, opening up to another person for help or love (especially a woman) seems frightening and risky. 
In an attempt to fill the void in our hearts, we smother our children and mother our men.

4. The final result is a long string of broken relationships with both men and women. 
We lack the emotional health and relational skills to overcome the bumps. It seems easier to quit and move on than to restore damaged relationships.

To overcome this pattern of pain, you and I have to lay down our carnal weapons of fear, self-defense, and hate and pick up some righteous weapons that are effective for overcoming lies and wounds of our true enemy.

If another woman has deeply hurt you, you may find it difficult to imagine how you could ever move beyond the pain of your past. In Women at War, Jan encourages you to allow your pain to be a catalyst for change. Ask God to nurture you. Let Him mentor you. As He heals the wounds of your past, you will begin to extend grace to others and start building a healthy attitude toward women.

Are you ready to move forward on the road to recovery? If yes, follow this link today!

Purchase Women at War


Copyright © 2018 by Jan Greenwood


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